Fourth experiment in waking precognition: The Moving Picture Girls Under the Palms

I’ve just completed another precognition experiment, in which I tried to obtain precognitive images of what I would read in the novel The Moving Picture Girls Under the Palms, by Laura Lee Hope (selected at random using Gutenberg’s random book feature).

I got my precogs on May 15 and finished the novel on May 20. Not a single one of the ten precogs “came true” either in the novel or in my extraliterary life.

The closest thing to a hit — and it’s not really very close at all — was the 9th item on my precog list, “plaid skirt blowing up — shoe stuck in the mud, coming off foot.” There is a scene in the novel in which one of the male characters gets stuck in quicksand, and the titular moving picture girls tear their skirts into strips in order to make a rope to pull him out. Aside from the juxtaposition of a skirt being destroyed and something being stuck in wet earth, all the details are different. The skirts in the novel are not plaid but khaki, and the man does not lose his shoe.

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2 Comments

Filed under Precognition / Prophecy

2 responses to “Fourth experiment in waking precognition: The Moving Picture Girls Under the Palms

  1. What you are really doing could be described as a test of ‘magic’ (somewhat in the sense of goetia) – to control and *use* supernatural methods to achieve useful/ ‘beneficial’ real world effects.

    I’m therefore rather pleased to hear that the experiments have not worked!

  2. Well, it’s certainly not goetia, unless you mean that any attempt to do anything “supernatural” entails an implied request that spirits come to one’s aid. I’m not evoking anything; rather, I’m testing Dunne’s theory that precognition is a normal “natural” human ability into which angels and demons need not enter. Nor am I really trying to do anything useful or beneficial. I mean, come on, I’m attempting to foresee the contents of novels selected at random!

    When I experimented with dream precognition, you encouraged me. I wonder what you find so different in the current round of experiments.

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